WildCast Now Available On Franklin County Radio Station

Monday, May 14, 2018

Tennessee WildCast is now available on its first radio station, WZYX, The Eagle Radio in Cowan. The program will air on Saturday mornings beginning at 6:05.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has been producing the where primarily the featured guests are the agency’s field and office staff. While the podcast is setup with a radio-style format, a television monitor has been part of the studio and often includes photographs and video to illustrate information being discussed. The audio portion of each show can be heard on WZYX in its entirety. The program is hosted by TWRA’s Doug Markham and Jason Harmon.

"We are proud to partner with WZYX each week and we look forward to bringing the latest outdoor information to the listeners in that area,” said Don King, chief of TWRA’s Information and Education Division, who joined Doug and Jason on the first WildCast that will also be on the radio. “With two FM signals, 94.5, 95.3 and one AM, signal, 1440, The Eagle Radio coverage map is filled with folks who love and appreciate the outdoors."

The show featured the premier of a new WildCast Theme song. Doug, Jason and Don shared information about the new elk tag raffle and proposed regulation changes being considered by the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission for the next two years.

Videos of WildCast and other TWRA programs are available on the TWRA website. For other radio stations or other electronic media interested in the possibility of receiving WildCAST, contact Don King at (615) 781-6506 or don.king@tn.gov.



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